How To Talk So Little Kids Will Listen

How To Talk So Little Kids Will Listen

“Almost any tedious task can be transformed if it’d infused with the spirit of play.” – Joanna Fabre and Julie King

I’m on this endless quest to produce the best children’s programming ever. I want kids to love going to school, going to the library, being outside and being with their families. But I am learning as a parent that not all tasks are straightforward. I want my child to sit in a car seat. And he struggles so he doesn’t have to be buckled in or restrained. I don’t want my son ripping things off the shelves even though he is curious and wants to touch everything. “Stop ripping Mommy’s plants apart!” I say with a huge amount of anxiety while I am trying to get ready for work.

When kids have meltdowns or they cry – this is my strength. I can easily turn the situation into a game and I can handle it pretty well. But when kids are destroying things or disorganizing the very orderly house – that can be challenging. But this book makes the case that commands, blaming, accusations, name calling, warnings, sarcasm, rhetorical questions, lectures and threats are not as effective as turning things into a game. People don’t want to be told to do – even small people. People have to want to do things themselves. Why lecture someone when you can have an inanimate plant talk to them?